FAQs

What is the goal of Advance for Kids pediatric therapist?

Which services would your child benefit from?

Why might a child require Physical Therapy?

What are the benefits of Physical Therapy?

Why might a child require Occupational Therapy?

What are the benefits of Occupational Therapy?

What is Sensory Integration?

S.I. Dysfunction can be…

What is the goal of Advance for Kids pediatric therapist?

The goal of our therapists is to assist children in reaching their highest functional level. This goal is achieved by facilitating the skills and movements needed to perform age appropriate self-help, play and recreational activities. Our therapists are part of a team, who work closely with the child’s physician, other therapists, teachers and the most important team member, you the parent or caregiver.

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Which services would your child benefit from?

Physical therapy focuses on the development or regaining of gross motor skill, lost due to neurological insult, genetic disorder, injury, burn, or other cause. Gross motor skills include activities such as head control, sitting, standing, crawling, walking, running, throwing, and kicking.

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Occupational therapy focuses on the development or regaining of fine motor skills and sensory integration lost due to neurological insult, genetic disorder, injury, or other causes. Fine motor skills include activities such as grasp, handwriting, scissor skills, dressing skills, and other self-care skills. Treatment also focuses on Sensory Integration.

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Why might a child require Physical Therapy?

Infants and children with the following diagnosis/deficits may require PT:

  • Prematurity
  • Developmental delay
  • Brachial Plexus injury
  • Downs Syndrome
  • Burns/open wounds
  • Neuromuscular disease
  • Congenital abnormalities
  • Orthopedic/Sport injury
  • Post orthopedic surgery
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis 

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What are the benefits of Physical Therapy?

  • Promote age-appropriate gross motor skills.
  • Prevent/non-surgically correct deformities.
  • Increase range of motion and strength.
  • Return to recreational and sport activities.
  • Increase independence in school and home.
  • Elicit positioning to improve functional level.
  • Recommend and train in the use of orthotics, adaptive equipment, and assertive technology.
  • Educate family with regard to the disease or disorder and provide activities to assist the child in functioning at the highest level.

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Why might a child require Occupational Therapy?

Infants and children with the following diagnosis/deficits may require OT:

  • Developmental delay
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Oral Motor Dysfunction
  • Poor Fine Motor Skills
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Orthopedic Disabilities 
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Visual Perceptual Deficits

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What are the benefits of Occupational Therapy?

  • Improve fine motor coordination.
  • Regulate level of arousal for participation in functional activities.
  • Increase socialization, organization skills, and self confidence.
  • Prevent deformities
  • Recommend and train in the use of orthotics, adaptive equipment, and assertive technology.
  • Educate family with regard to the disease or disorder and provide activities to assist the child in functioning at the highest level.

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What is Sensory Integration?

Sensory Integration (S.I.) is the way a child receives, learns, and organizes sensations from their body and the environment to complete meaningful activities.

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Occupational therapists provide treatment to children who are hypersensitive (defensive) or hypo-sensitive (seeking) to help regulate and filter sensory input.

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S.I. Dysfunction can be…

Tactile - child is fearful or avoids light touch, getting messy, having their hair brushed, or prefers to keep shoes on.

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Proprioception - child is fearful of movement due to poor postural control, has a decreased awareness of pain and danger, craves rough housing, or frequently bumps into things.

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Vestibular - child avoids playground equipment, appears clumsy, or constantly craves motion I.e. running, jumping, rocking, and/or spinning.

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Auditory - child is fearful of loud noises or disregards noises.

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Visual - child is fearful of bright lights, avoids eye contact, or has difficulty with reading and writing.

  • Low birth weight
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Spina-Bifida
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Head injuries
  • Torticollis
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Endurance deficit
  • Gait abnormality
  • Sensory Integration Dysfunction
  • Upper Extremity/Hand Injuries
  • Prematurity
  • Handwriting
  • Head Injury
  • Downs Syndrome
  • ADHD
  • Autism/PDD

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